Tom's Oatmeal Stout 2

Brewed by tomcocca on January 24, 2011 07:30

Recipe: Tom's Oatmeal Stout 2

Original gravity: 1.065

Final gravity: 1.018

Abv: 6.16

Bitterness:

Started at: January 24, 2011 07:30

Finished at: February 19, 2011 14:00

Bottled: Yes

Kegged: No

Label: OS

Taste this Batch

Batch Notes

Note Taken: January 24, 2011 15:00
Batch Stage: Primary
Temperature: 75.0
Note:
Brewed the first batch of this re-vamped recipe. Pitched the yeast at 75 degrees. Beer smelled great. The OG was a touch higher than I was expecting, this was my first time doing a partial mash so I was estimating a 75% efficiency on the system, I may need to adjust. Wort smelled great, hoping the oat malt and biscuit malt really elevate this beer.


Note Taken: January 25, 2011 09:37
Batch Stage: Primary
Temperature: 70.0
Note:
Fermentation started about 8 hours after pitching the yeast, and was going at a very rapid rate. Now 36 hours later the bubbling has slowed to a rate of about 1 bubble every second and a half.


Note Taken: January 30, 2011 20:37
Batch Stage: Seconday
Temperature: 64.0
Gravity: 1.022
ABV Potential: 5.6
Note:
Racked the beer to the carboy for a secondary fermentation. Looked decently clear, funnel filter didn't catch much at all, there was maybe 2 inches of trub at the bottom of the pail. Hoping that the FG comes down about .004 (down to 1.018) by the time I bottle (3 weeks maybe). I'll take a hydrometer reading in about a week.


Note Taken: February 12, 2011 14:30
Batch Stage: Seconday
Temperature: 64.0
Gravity: 1.019
ABV Potential: 5.9
Note:
Took a gravity reading with my thief and was completely surprised to see the gravity had dropped. Most likely I will bottle in 1 week and hope the gravity drops just a little more.


Note Taken: February 19, 2011 14:30
Batch Stage: Bottle
Temperature: 64.0
Gravity: 1.018
ABV Potential: 6.1
Note:
Bottled the beer, smelled awesome and the gravity did end up dropping to the point that I wanted (1.018). I hit 72% attenuation on the yeast, who's range was 72-77% attenuation. I will bottle condition for 2 weeks and then try a bottle but I think it is going to need more time than that to hit its potential.


American Amber Ale - American Barleywine - American Brown Ale - American IPA - American Pale Ale - American Stout - American Wheat or Rye Beer - Applewine - Baltic Porter - Belgian Blond Ale - Belgian Dark Strong Ale - Belgian Dubbel - Belgian Golden Strong Ale - Belgian Pale Ale - Belgian Specialty Ale - Belgian Tripel - Berliner Weisse - Bière de Garde - Blonde Ale - Bohemian Pilsener - Braggot - Brown Porter - California Common Beer - Christmas/Winter Specialty Spiced Beer - Classic American Pilsner - Classic Rauchbier - Common Cider  - Common Perry - Cream Ale - Cyser - Dark American Lager - Doppelbock - Dortmunder Export - Dry Mead - Dry Stout - Dunkelweizen - Düsseldorf Altbier - Eisbock - English Barleywine - English Cider  - English IPA - Extra Special/Strong Bitter (English Pale Ale) - Flanders Brown Ale/Oud Bruin - Flanders Red Ale - Foreign Extra Stout - French Cider - Fruit Beer - Fruit Cider - Fruit Lambic - German Pilsner (Pils) - Gueuze - Imperial IPA - Irish Red Ale - Kölsch - Lite American Lager - Maibock/Helles Bock - Metheglin - Mild - Munich Dunkel - Munich Helles - New England Cider - Northern English Brown Ale - Northern German Altbier - Oatmeal Stout - Oktoberfest - Old Ale - Open Category Mead - Other Fruit Melomel - Other Smoked Beer - Other Specialty Cider/Perry - Premium American Lager - Pyment - Robust Porter - Roggenbier (German Rye Beer) - Russian Imperial Stout - Saison - Schwarzbier (Black Beer) - Scottish Export 80/- - Scottish Heavy 70/- - Scottish Light 60/- - Semi-sweet Mead - Southern English Brown - Special/Best/Premium Bitter - Specialty Beer - Spice, Herb, or Vegetable Beer - Standard American Lager - Standard/Ordinary Bitter - Straight (Unblended) Lambic - Strong Scotch Ale - Sweet Mead - Sweet Stout - Traditional Bock - Traditional Perry  - Vienna Lager - Weizen/Weissbier - Weizenbock - Witbier - Wood-Aged Beer